Adult Probation Supervision

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Probation is

  • part of the court system;
  • a criminal or municipal sentence for adults;
  • a program to supervise clients who have been diverted through pretrial intervention or conditional discharge;
  • an opportunity to remain in the community when guidelines are met;
  • a system of supervision and services to help clients reach their goals; and
  • an opportunity for self-improvement for clients to become responsible and law-abiding people.

In general, clients must:

Participants are urged to work, get job readiness training or enroll in school if their substance-use disorder is stable.

Probation officers help clients successfully complete their conditions of supervision. Probation officers also

  • help clients find the services they need, such as job placement or counseling services; and
  • track the progress of each client and report back to the court on each case.

Violations of Probation

The probation officer will use sanctions and incentives to encourage compliance with the terms of the sentence and the conditions of probation. If a client does not comply, the probation officer will file a violation of probation (VOP). If a VOP is filed, the client’s probation could be revoked and the client could go to jail.

Behavioral Health/Substance Abuse Resources
Vicinage Probation Contact Information

Information for Crime Victims

Restitution

A victim or the family of a victim of a crime committed in New Jersey can be repaid for losses and expenses that resulted from the crime. This repayment is called restitution.

Any convicted person might have to pay restitution to the victim or the victim's family as part of their sentence. The victim’s expenses could include lost wages, medical bills, funeral costs, the value of stolen or damages property, loss of business, and other related debts.

When restitution is ordered, the judge decides how much money is to be paid, to whom, and over what time period. The judge will consider if the offender has other debts, such as child support or restitution for other crimes, and if the offender is employed. The judge will set up a payment plan. Payments are made to Probation Services and then Probation Services will send checks to the victims.

Probation Services will need to know the victims’ current address in order to send payment.

Read more about restitution

Restitution payments

Restitution checks are paid at least once a month as long as the client is making timely payments to probation

How to tell if your check is for restitution

If you have received a check from the State of New Jersey Judiciary and are unsure of its purpose, the client’s name and reference number (i.e. Client ID), and the Court's phone number will be printed on the top of the payment statement for any questions you may have.

If restitution checks stop coming

Restitution checks are sent based on the payments received from the person placed on probation. As long as enough funds are received, restitution checks will be generated.

The court must have your current address in order to send your payment. Contact your local probation office if your address changes

Victim of Crimes Compensation Office (VCCO)

Victims or their families also can receive compensation from the New Jersey Victims of Crime Compensation Office (VCCO). The VCCO can repay victims or their families for out-of-pocket medical expenses, lost wages, and funeral costs only after other sources such as insurance, health benefits, welfare, or Social Security have paid their share of the expenses. VCCO does not cover property loss or pain and suffering.

For information on filing claims, contact:
NJ Victim of Crimes Compensation Office
50 Park Place, 5th floor
Newark, NJ 07102
1-877-658-2221.

Victims’ Involvement in the intensive supervision program (ISP)

  • ISP clients make payments to the Victims of Crime Compensation Office, if ordered.
  • All victims are invited to attend ISP hearings and to give the judges their view about your release.
  • Victims often support release into the program, since entry to the program means payment to the victims, if ordered.
  • Victims can choose to volunteer to become part of the ISP client’s case plan.

Common Acronyms and Glossary of Terms

Adjudication – The term used for youth who have been sentenced. Youth will receive an Order of Disposition once they are adjudicated which is a family court order. See Juvenile FAQ #6 for more details.

Arrears - Past due, unpaid fines, fees and/or restitution owed by the person ordered to pay by a court. You may receive a notice stating you are Past Due or Delinquent with your account.

Civil Judgment – A civil judgment is a statewide lien against all real property owned by the judgment debtor effectively blocking the sale of that property until the lien is satisfied. It may be issued against all real property, bank accounts and/or personal property in order to satisfy financial obligations owed.

CMO – Case Management Organization. They provide support and services for youth with mental health, behavioral and addicition needs. Contact PerformCare at 1-877-652-7624 for services.

Continuance – Approval to move a legal proceeding to a later date.

DCP&P - Division of Child Protection & Permanency (formerly DYFS)

Deferred Disposition (JDD) – A deferred disposition is when the court sets aside sentencing you to anything specific, such as a term of probation or incarceration for a period of time. See Juvenile FAQ #5 for more details.

Disposition - The final outcome of a case, with reference to decisions made by a court.

DNA – A DNA test is required of every person convicted of a crime, found not guilty by reason of insanity or adjudicated delinquent.

DOC – Department of Corrections.

Docket Number – The identifying number assigned to every case filed in the court.

Early Termination – also known as an early discharge. This is when you are able to be discharged from Probation prior to your term ending. See Juvenile FAQ #9 for more details.

Ombudsman – A representative from Probation who can answer questions and provide information about probation and court procedures. The ombudsman cannot give legal advice or tell you what you should do about any court matter

Fines/Fees

  • DAEF – Drug Abuse Education Fund
  • DEDR – Drug Enforcement & Demand Reduction Fine
  • DVVF – Domestic Violence victim Fund
  • LEOTEF – Law Enforcement Officer’s Training and Equipment Fund
  • VWAF – Victim/Witness Assistance Fund
  • VCCB – Victim’s Crime Compensation Board
  • Restitution

FRO – Final Restraining Order. A final order restraining (FRO) shall be issued only on a specific finding of domestic violence or on a stipulation by a defendant to the commission of an act or acts of domestic violence. Defendants may receive a Contempt of Court complaint for failure to abide by the FRO.

Hearing Officers – Hearing Officers are appointed by the Chief Justice to preside over preliminary hearings in matters where there is a deficient compliance with payment of court-ordered financial or community service obligations.

Income Withholding/Wage Withholding/Garnishment – A process in which automatic deductions are made from wages or other income to pay a financial obligation.

ISP Intensive Supervision Program.

JDAI – Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative. This is a statewide initiative to reduce youth in detention centers.

JISP Juvenile Intensive Supervision Program.

JJC – Juvenile Justice Commission – the statewide organization that oversees juvenile justice programs.

JOC – Judgment of Conviction – Also known as a court order. The written decision issued by a court of law. The JOC is the final judgment of guilt in a criminal case. Conviction is being found guilty of a criminal charge.

Lien - Official claim against funds for payment, for example, a claim against future court settlement(s).

Megan’s Law – A federal and state law requiring law enforcement authorities to make information available to the public regarding registered sex offenders.

Non-Compliance - Failure to obey a court-ordered obligation.

Ombudsman – A representative from Probation who can answer questions and provide information about probation and court procedures. The ombudsman cannot give legal advice or tell you what you should do about any court matter

PDR – Predisposition Report. A report concerning a youth to the Family Court containing background information.

PerformCare - Statewide contracted system of care provider.

PSI – Pre-Sentence Investigation Report. A report to the criminal sentencing judge containing background information on the defendant.

SPO – Senior Probation Officer

Tax Offset (SOIL) – The amount of money taken from State income tax refund to satisfy a financial obligation.

VACPO – Vicinage Assistant Chief Probation Officer

VOP – Violation of Probation. A Violation of Probation is the formal filing of charges against a probationer for violating conditions of probation.

Warrant – A court order authorizing law enforcement officers to make an arrest or conduct a search.

Warrant to Satisfy Judgment – A judgment is filed when a client fails to make payments on a financial obligation. A Warrant to Satisfy Judgment is the proof the judgment creditor (the person who won the case) uses to acknowledge the judgment (financial obligation owed) has been paid.

Fines, Restitution and Community Service

Overview:

If you are sentenced to probation, you might have to pay fines or restitution or perform community service. Your probation officer will oversee your completion of these requirements. If you fail to make any payment or fail to comply with community service requirements, you might be referred to the Comprehensive Enforcement Program (CEP) for court action.

Payments

How to pay

  • Cash
  • Check
  • Money order

Checks and money orders should be made payable to "Treasurer, State of New Jersey."

Include your full name and client identification number to ensure proper credit is made to your account.

Personal checks returned unpaid will result in the removal of the option to pay by personal check.

Fees

For adult cases, a transaction fee will be deducted from your total payment amount every time you make a payment.

  • For payments between $3 and $9.99, the transaction fee is $1.
  • For any payments $10.00 or more, the transaction fee is $2.

There is no transaction fee for juvenile cases.

Where to pay

Payments can be made at all main probation offices and the county courthouse you were sentenced at Probation Payment Locations

*Satellite probation offices cannot accept cash.

Online payments and credit card payments are not accepted.

Where do payments go?

Payments are distributed according to state law:

  • The Victims of Crime Compensation Office (VCCO) provides funds to cover claims made by crime victims.
  • Restitution is a repayment of funds to the victims of your offense.
  • The Law Enforcement Officers Training and Equipment Fund (LEOTEF) supports the work of law enforcement.
  • The Safe Neighborhood Services Fund (SNSF) provides funds for community law enforcement programs.
  • The Forensic Lab Fee provides funds for county and state crime laboratories.
  • The Drug Enforcement and Demand Reduction Penalty (DEDR) supports local rehabilitation programs and educational services.
  • Fines are paid to the state, county or municipality.
  • The Domestic Violence Victim Fund (DVVF) provides funds to the Department of Human Services, Division of Youth and Family Services to fund programming for domestic violence victims and to educate the public about this issue.
  • The Sex Offender Monthly Penalty provides funds to the Department of Treasury to fund sex offender monitoring
  • The Probation Supervision fee provides funds to the New Jersey State Treasurer for use by the state.
  • The transaction fee provides funds for the court computerization.

When should I contact probation?

You should contact probation with any change of circumstances that might affect your ability to pay or perform community service. You also must contact probation with any changes to your address.

Helpful Employment Resources:

NJ Re-entry Program
Career One Stop
NJ Career Connections

Restitution

Overview:

A victim or the family of a victim of a crime committed in New Jersey can be repaid for losses and expenses that resulted from the crime. This repayment is called restitution. All convicted persons might have to pay restitution to the victim or the victim's family.

Read more about restitution

Restitution payments

Restitution checks are paid at least once a month as long as the client is making timely payments to Probation Services.

How to tell if your check is for restitution

If you have received a check from the State of New Jersey Judiciary and are unsure of its purpose, the client’s name and reference number (i.e. Client ID), and the Court's phone number will be printed on the top of the payment statement for any questions you may have.

If restitution checks stop coming

Restitution checks are sent based on the payments received from the person placed on probation. As long as enough funds are received, restitution checks will be generated.

The court must have your current address in order to send your payment. Contact your local probation office if your address changes.

Community Service

A community service sentence requires a client to perform work without compensation at a private non-profit organization or government agency for a period of time that is decided by the court. Probation will make sure all clients are referred to a suitable community service worksite and will monitor the client’s progress until completion of the court-ordered hours.

If community service is the only condition of your sentence, the case is assigned to a community service probation officer. If community service is ordered as only a part of your probation, your supervising probation officer will monitor your community service progress. Failure to comply might result in a summons to appear at a Comprehensive Enforcement Program (CEP) hearing or your case being returned to the county court you were sentenced at.

Whom can I talk to about my community service?

Contact the probation officer assigned to your case.

What if I am unable to complete my community service?

You must provide documented evidence of any reason that prohibits you from completing your court-ordered community service for consideration. In this case, you must contact local probation office.

When should I contact probation?

You should contact probation with any change of circumstances that might affect your ability to pay or perform community service. You also must contact probation with any changes to your address.

Comprehensive Enforcement Program (CEP)

Overview:

The Comprehensive Enforcement Program (CEP) gives people who fail to meet their court-ordered payments or community service requirements a chance to set up a reasonable plan to meet these conditions.

Whom can I talk to about my case?

If you are on probation, you can talk to your probation officer. If you are not on probation, but still owe money, you can speak to the contact on your payment notices or contact your local probation office.

If I owe money on more than one case, which one gets paid first?

When there is more than one case, all fines, fees and restitution with the oldest case are paid completely before any money is applied on the next oldest case.

CEP Summons

If you receive a CEP summons, you have fallen behind in meeting your existing court-ordered obligations. Those obligations could include the payment of fines or fees or the performance of community service. At the hearing you will be able to explain any change of circumstances that might affect your ability to pay or to perform community service. The hearing will be conducted by a hearing officer.

What should I bring to a CEP Hearing?

Bring any documentation that will help the hearing officer review why you are behind with court-ordered obligations.

What to expect at your CEP hearing

What happens if I do not show up for a CEP hearing?

A bench warrant might be issued for your arrest. Also, a default order might be issued for further sanctions, such as

  • suspension of your driver’s license;
  • a civil judgment filed against you;
  • a lien against your personal assets;
  • income withholding, wage withholding, or wage garnishment; or
  • a tax offset that sends your state tax return directly to the court.

Do I need an attorney to represent me in my collection or community service case?

You can choose to be represented by an attorney, but it is not required. If you wish to have an attorney, you can consult an attorney of your own choosing. If you need help finding an attorney, try asking your local county bar association for a legal referral service phone number or check the NJ State Bar Association website for information on lawyer referral services.

What if I receive a summons for CEP, but I am not behind on my payments?

If you get a summons and believe you are up to date with your payments, contact the probation officer listed on your court notice immediately. If your appearance is not excused by Probation Services before your scheduled hearing, you must appear in court.

Glossary of Common CEP Terms

Arrears – Past due, unpaid fines, fees or restitution owed by the person ordered to pay by a court.

Bench Warrant – An order from the court giving legal authority to law enforcement to arrest a person for failure to appear for a court hearing or failure to comply with a court order.

Civil Judgment – A civil judgment is a statewide lien against all real property owned by the judgment debtor. This means that the property cannot be sold until the lien is satisfied. It could be issued against all real property, bank accounts and/or personal property in order to satisfy financial obligations owed.

Client ID Number – This is an identifying number assigned to a probation case.

Collection Notice Types:

Past Due – This notice means that your account is overdue and the payments on the account must be brought up to date.

Delinquency – This notice means court action can be avoided if you pay your overdue amount in full. The next letter you receive will be a court summons.

Summons – This notice says that you need to appear at a CEP hearing. You will have a chance to explain any change of circumstances that might affect your ability to pay your court-ordered fines and fees.

Community Service Notice Types:

Notice of Failure to Comply with Community Service – You will receive this notice if you failed to comply with a condition of your community service.

Summons - This notice says that you need to appear at a CEP hearing. You will have a chance to explain any change of circumstances that might affect your ability to pay your court-ordered fines and fees.

Court Order – The written decision issued by a court of law. A collection or community service court order says how much is owed or the number of community service hours that must be completed.

Disposition - The final settlement of a case, with reference to decisions made by a court.

Docket Number – The identifying number assigned to every case filed in the court.

Income Withholding/Wage Withholding/Garnishment – A process in which automatic deductions are made from wages or other income to pay court-ordered fines, fees or restitution.

Lien - Official claim against funds for payment, for example, a claim against future court settlement(s).

Modification of a court order – Any change or adjustment to a previous court order.

Non-compliance - Failure to obey a court-ordered obligation.

Obligation – Anything that an individual is required to do by law, ordered by a judge.

Sanctions - Penalties imposed by the court for violation of a court-ordered obligation.

Tax Offset (SOIL) – The amount of money taken from state income tax refund to pay overdue fines, fees or restitution.

Sex Offender Supervision

If you are on probation as a sex offender, a specially trained probation officer will supervise you, track your progress, and help you find the services you need.

Sex offender registration

Most sex offenders must register with local law enforcement. Failure to register could result in criminal charges.

Important information for sex offenders from the NJ State Police

Internet Monitoring and Computer/Device Restrictions

You might not be allowed to access the Internet as part of your conditions of probation. Your probation officer might check your computer, laptop, cell phone, or other devices that connect to the Internet. Your probation officer will speak to family members or anyone that you live within your home.

You will have to pay for the cost of Internet monitoring. You will not be allowed to have Apple devices while you are on probation. You can ask your probation officer any questions you have about Internet monitoring.

Other requirements of probation for sex offenders

Visiting and moving out of state

You must speak to your probation officer before making plans to leave the state. You might have to register as a sex offender in the state you are visiting. Your probation officer can give you more information.

Behavioral Health/Substance Abuse Resources
Vicinage Probation Contact Information

Behavioral Health/Substance Abuse Resources

Behavioral Health Resources:

*In case of emergency: If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis, call 911 right away.

Emergency Crisis Centers
Community Based Mental Health Agencies by County
Homeless Services
Advocacy and Family Support
Mental Health Association in New Jersey
Veteran Services

Batterer's Intervention Services:

Use the links below to find batterer's intervention services in your area

Department of Children and Families Domestic Violence Services
NJ Coalition to End Domestic Violence (NJCEDV) 24-Hour Helpline: 800-572-7233

Substance Abuse Resources:

**If you or someone you know is experiencing a drug overdose or alcohol poisoning call 911 right away.

Probation Services Ombudsman Program

How to contact the Probation Ombudsman

Phone: 609-815-3810 ext.16314
Fax: 609-777-3100
E-mail ProbationHelp.Mailbox@njcourts.gov

What is an Ombudsman?

The goal of the Probation Ombudsman is to provide information and assistance with probation and court procedures and to respond to questions from Probation clients and the public

The Probation Ombudsman cannot represent clients or court users, nor provide legal advice. The Probation Ombudsman attends and coordinates community events, county fairs and other events to familiarize the public with information about Probation and the court system, as well as build public trust and confidence in the courts.

See the list of upcoming court seminars and public events

Contact the Probation Ombudsman:

  • If you have customer service issues;
  • If you have a complaint;
  • If you need contact information; or
  • If you have a question about reporting instructions.

The Probation Ombudsman will make inquires to help resolve your concerns.

What Can the Probation Ombudsman Do For You?

The Probation Ombudsman works with all parts of probation supervision including Adult, Juvenile and ISP/JISP to:

  • provide probation client assistance;
  • provide information to the public;
  • engage in community outreach;
  • investigate and resolve complaints;
  • conduct workshops; and
  • answer questions about probation.

What the Probation Ombudsman CANNOT Do For You:

  • give legal advice or recommend a lawyer;
  • give an opinion about what will happen if you do not report as directed;
  • talk to your probation officer or the judge for you; or
  • change any of your conditions of probation.
See all Judiciary Ombudsman Offices
For more information about the Ombudsman Program
Take our survey

Domestic Violence Supervision

If you are on probation as a result of a domestic violence case, a specially trained probation officer will supervise you, track your progress, and help you find the services you need.

In addition to probation standard conditions, you might have to attend batterers counseling and you might have increased reporting.

  • Frequent contact with your probation officer at the reporting office and at home
  • Batterers counseling might be required
  • Drug testing might be required
  • Drug, alcohol and psychological counseling when necessary

Participants are urged to work, get job readiness training or enroll in school if their substance-use disorder is stable.

Contacting your probation officer

Your probation officer will give you the contact information. If you cannot find it, contact your local probation division for help.

Batterer's Intervention Services

Use the links below to find batterer's intervention services in your area

NJ Department of Children and Families Domestic Violence Services
NJ Coalition to End Domestic Violence (NJCEDV) 24-Hour Helpline: 800-572-7233

Visiting and moving out of state

You will need permission from your probation officer to leave the state.

You might not be allowed to move to another state. Your probation officer will be able to tell you how to determine your eligibility.

Behavioral Health/Substance Abuse Resources
Vicinage Probation Contact Information

Intensive Supervision Program

What is the Intensive Supervision Program?

The Intensive Supervision Program (ISP)is a choice that certain state prison inmates are allowed to work their way back into the community under intensive supervision. To be allowed into the program, you must show that you can follow the program's strict rules. Inmates must present a plan that their return to the community will result in a positive social adjustment and will not jeopardize public’s safety.

By no means is ISP a "slap on the wrist." It is "intense." For that reason, this program is not suited for everyone serving a prison term, and success is not a sure thing. But for those who do succeed, the program can be a life altering experience.
Read the ISP brochure for information.

Features of the New Jersey Intensive Supervision Program:

  • Regular contact with your ISP officer
  • A plan for life in the community
  • Drug testing
  • Employment, schooling, or job training
  • Community service
  • Firm curfew rules
  • Drug, alcohol and mental health treatment. See the list of agencies that can provide these services.
  • Required payments towards court fines, fees and other financial duties

Frequently Asked Questions

Crimes Not Eligible

Entry to ISP is not a given. All persons sentenced to state prison are allowed to apply, except for those convicted of certain crimes. See the complete list of crimes that are not eligible.

Applying to ISP

Applications are available online at all county jails, and at all state prisons. Answer all of the questions, including who will be your community sponsor. If you do not have answers to all of the questions, submit the application with as much information as you have.

The Interview

Before you enter ISP, you will be need to write a plan explaining what you are going to do to help you avoid getting into trouble in the future. What you put in your plan is important. The people who review your application will look at it carefully. You should be able to do the things that you say you can do.

An ISP officer will also interview you at the state prison as part of your application. During the interview, the ISP officer will review your plan with you and ask questions to help find out whether the plan can be reached.

ISP Screening Board/ISP Resentencing Panel

The ISP Screening Board made up of a person from the community, corrections staff and an ISP employee, will review your application and again interview you. If the Screening Board believes that you are right for the ISP program, a panel of ISP judges will review your application. The judges make the final decision. If your application is accepted by the judges, you will be released from prison into the program.

Learn how to volunteer on an ISP Screening Board

Entry to ISP

If you are accepted into the program, you will be released from prison into ISP. It is up to you to follow the rules to stay in the program. You will have to live up to all of the parts in your plan. Your community sponsor and your ISP officer will help you, but you must make sure you do what you agreed to do.

Rules of ISP

  • Get a job within 30 days of acceptance into ISP;
  • Obey a 6 p.m. curfew;
  • Support your children and meet your family needs;
  • Take part in treatment programs;
  • Do not leave New Jersey without permission from your ISP officer;
  • Do not own or carry any type of weapon;
  • Allow your ISP officer to visit your home and search you, or places or your things;
  • Do not use drugs or alcohol, and agree to drug and alcohol testing;
  • Pay all fines , fees and restitution ordered by the court; and
  • Tell your employer that you are on ISP within 30 days of getting a job.

Length of the program

If you are accepted into ISP, you can expect to be in the program for at least 16 months. If your original sentence was for more than five years, or if you break any program rules, you will be in the program even longer.

Regional ISP and JISP offices

Mental Health Supervision

*In case of emergency: If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis, call 911 or an emergency crisis center right away.

If you are on probation and have mental health concerns, you might be eligible for specialized supervision. A specially trained probation officer will supervise you, track your progress, and help you find the services you need. Ask your probation officer if you qualify.

Mental health supervision provides:

  • Smaller caseloads, more individualized attention, and more field visits;
  • Focus on treatment and social services; and
  • Coordination with treatment providers and families to build a strong support network.

Selection process for the adult mental health supervision caseload:

  • You can speak to your probation officer if you think you will be more successful on probation with a specialized probation officer who understands mental health concerns. Also, your probation officer might speak with you if he or she thinks you will benefit from extra probation support.
  • In order to be considered for this caseload, you must complete a mental health assessment or provide a copy of an assessment completed within the past year.
  • If you are not receiving mental health treatment and want a referral, you can ask your probation officer to provide one or you can find a Community Based Mental Health Agencies by County on your own.

Mental Health Services, advocacy and support resources for my family and me:

Moving Out Of State

Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision(ICAOS)

Do you want to transfer your supervision?

The Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision (ICAOS) helps protect the public and provide offenders with their best possible opportunity for success. The ICAOS website provides clients, their families, and their friends with helpful information and resources to prepare themselves for the interstate transfer process.

Answers to questions like "can I travel out-of-state for work while I am on probation," and "can I go a to long-term treatment facility out-of-state while I am on probation" can be found here.

Municipal Court/Conditional Discharge

Probation officers also supervise adults sentenced to probation in municipal court. Clients sentences in municipal court must report to the Vicinage Probation Division to review and sign their conditions of probation. Probation officers will review the reporting requirements with them and then monitor their compliance during their term of probation.

Conditional Discharge Requirements:

  • Report to your county probation division and take a drug test.
  • You will be assigned a probation officer.
  • The officer will tell you where to go in order to pay any fines, fees and restitution.
  • If your drug test is negative, you will not be required to report to your probation officer again.

Probation Requirements

  • Report to your county probation division and take a drug test.
  • You will be assigned a probation officer.
  • The officer will tell you where to go in order to pay any fines, fees and restitution.
  • If your drug test is negative, you will not be required to report to your probation officer again.
  • Your case will be reviewed about 30 days before your term is completed to make sure that all monies have been paid and you have not picked up any new charges.
  • If you have successfully met these requirements, a notice will be sent to the municipal court to dismiss the case.
Vicinage Probation Contact Information
Municipal Court Contact Information
Behavioral Health/Substance Abuse Resources

Supervision for Pretrial Intervention Clients

Pretrial Intervention (PTI) clients are supervised by probation officers. The goal is to build on the clients' strengths and give them tools to avoid future criminal behavior.

There are two important differences between the two programs. First, PTI only admits first-time offenders. Second, participants are admitted before their case is decided.

Probation officers assist clients in gaining skills to straighten out personal problems in order to avoid future arrests. The charges are dismissed if the client completes the program.

Length of PTI Service

The term of supervision can be from six months to three years. The length of the term is stated on the order you received from the court. In order to complete PTI, you must comply with all conditions of the program. If you do not meet these conditions, the court can terminate you from the program and your charges will be prosecuted.

Conditions of PTI

Obey all federal, state and municipal laws and ordinances.

Notify your probation officer within 24 hours of a new arrest or court summons.

Answer all inquiries by your probation officer truthfully.

Permit inspection of your home and, if appropriate, other places where you send time.

Promptly report any change of address or residence to your probation officer.

Obtain permission to move outside of New Jersey.

Get a job and maintain employment. Notify your probation officer if you change your place of work or if you lose your job.

Cooperate with any test, treatment and/or counseling deemed necessary by your probation officer.

How to apply to PTI

Local probation offices

Expungement of PTI from your criminal record

Behavioral Health/Substance Abuse Resources
Vicinage Probation Contact Information

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Drug Court Supervision

**If you or someone you know is experiencing a drug overdose or alcohol poisoning call 911 right away.

Drug court is a program for non-violent participants with substance abuse issues who, without drug court, would be facing a state prison or county jail sentence. Drug court provides a combination of substance abuse treatment and probation supervision to help people change their behavior and build a better life.

Getting into drug court

  • You will need an attorney in order to apply for admission to the drug court program.
  • A substance abuse evaluator will assess your addiction to determine if it serious enough to require treatment.
  • A criminal history will be completed to ensure that you meet the legal requirements for drug court. This includes no history of violent crimes or sex offenses; and
  • In some cases, drug court is mandatory. Therefore, the court might require you to apply for drug court if the court find that you meet the requirements.

Find out more about drug court

Requirements for drug court supervision

Participants are urged to work, get job readiness training or enroll in school if their substance-use disorder is stable.

Length of the program

Most participants usually stay in the program for 3 years. Some participants are released early if they meet all of the program requirements. Participants who fail to comply with the program rules or who need more time to meet program requirements could be on the program for up to 5 years.

Expungement Eligibility

Drug court participants who graduated the drug court program could be eligible for expungement of their criminal records. Not all criminal records are expungable so you should consult with your attorney for more details regarding expungement

When to contact your probation officer

While you should feel free to contact your probation officer with any questions or concerns, you should contact your probation officer or the drug court supervisor immediately, if:

  • you forgot to report to probation on the day that you were supposed to report
  • you forgot to be in by your curfew time
  • if you relapse (use any drugs or alcohol) or feel like you are likely to do so
  • if you have any contact with the police
  • if you get a summons to appear in court
  • if you have any question about a medication that you were prescribed
  • if you wish visit out of state

Temporary Housing Assistance

You might qualify for temporary housing assistance through a federal grant that was provided to the Drug Court Program. Ask your probation officer for more information.

Helpful links

Opioid Overdose Resources

Find local drug court coordinators by county